Thanks Thanks:  16
Likes Likes:  23
Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 51 to 59 of 59

Thread: Wheel and tire tech

  1. Top Of Page | #51
    HerThing's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Lol. I knew it would be a bit much, that's why I threw in the "you as an end user" Haha! I am 17x9.5 et25. Now, the spring rate of the eibachs is a major contributing factor, they are quite a bit stiffer than the stickers. But yes, the combinations are endless. But, even if I Jack up the front corner to "flex", it still has clearance, so, there is the swaybar showing its capabilities. But, I'd love to stay and further this, I'll be back tomorrow, have to work at 4, or should I say, go to the place I work and sleep? Lmao!




  2. Top Of Page | #52
    HerThing's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Holy shit, I lied, just measured, 17x10. Haha! From lip edge to inner barrel edge it's 10.5. Wowee. He said they were 9.5, looks 1/2 inch of come up for me!


  3. Top Of Page | #53
    On a quest of STi erudition! Alin's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    http://www.1010tires.com/About/Tech

    http://t3hclap.com/brembo-clearance

    here are some more resources if you want to add.

    teh clap is on iwsti. hes a wheel and suspension guru. take a look when you get a chance


    Quote Originally Posted by Batmobile_Engage View Post
    It doesn't have to have a nut on the outside. Many are short, but I often try to find long ones that sometimes have a bend in them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Batmobile_Engage View Post
    I don't need another reason to dig through 4 layers of clothes to whip the sea monster out in 0 degree weather.

  4. Top Of Page | #54
    HerThing's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Good info! I've used the 1010 tools a bit in research.


  5. Top Of Page | #55
    Meat Product Toy Spamby's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Here is a good calculator for finding out where your wheel/tire will be when changing offsets and tire sizes. The illustration is a bit rudimentary but it illustrates what's needed.
    After adding your criteria, you can go to your car and put a tape measure on the wheel edge to find out where it will sit in relation to the fender or whatever you want to measure.


    http://www.willtheyfit.com/index.php...et2=38#content


  6. Thanks IGOTASTi, Fitment Inc. thanked for this post
    Likes Fitment Inc. liked this post
  7. Top Of Page | #56
    Eats rice, drinks V8. Batmobile_Engage's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Re: Wheel and tire tech

    Hey everyone, I decided to bump this great thread for viewing by our newer members, since we last discussed this almost 5 years ago.

    Hopefully it'll answer a lot of questions for everyone.

    Quote Originally Posted by IGOTASTi View Post
    I will put the last drop of oil on Earth in my turbocharged machine and smile amongst the carcinogenic fumes as I burn T-Rex’s family tree just so I can pass you, sideways in the middle of a blizzard.
    Member Journal: https://www.igotasti.com/vBforum/showthread.php?5453-The-Batmobile_Engage-Member-Journal

  8. Thanks Eagleye, Alin thanked for this post
    Likes Eagleye, Alin liked this post
  9. Top Of Page | #57
    MedicMike's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Re: Wheel and tire tech

    Quote Originally Posted by Spamby View Post
    5 psi increments starting from flat to max pressure.
    I'll do it this weekend when I change the oil in the car.
    This will be only for my tire setup but should give a good roundabout.
    Without reading until the very end I post this to ponder, tire pressure is way more critical than one may think. Pressure, over or under can effect how the rubber heats. This is called heat cycle. In order for a tire to gain maximum grip is must reach a temperature on which the sticky stuff is cooking off the tire. Tire pressure increases as the tire's carcass heats. Too much cold temperature pressure prevents the tire from heating to the proper sticky temp. Too little overheats the tire and it gets really greasy. On track days most tire manufacturers will give you a ballpark stab at what your temps should be. You can compare that pressure to the pressure of the tire after some hot laps. In a previous life I raced a Ducati with WERA. On a motorcycle that hot/cold difference was around 3%. The principal us the same for a car, however the difference, well I have no clue. But I suppose the point being 1 or 2 pounds makes a difference on the street or on the track.


  10. Thanks Alin thanked for this post
    Likes Alin liked this post
  11. Top Of Page | #58
    Track Monkey Grinder34's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Re: Wheel and tire tech

    Quote Originally Posted by MedicMike View Post
    Without reading until the very end I post this to ponder, tire pressure is way more critical than one may think. Pressure, over or under can effect how the rubber heats. This is called heat cycle. In order for a tire to gain maximum grip is must reach a temperature on which the sticky stuff is cooking off the tire. Tire pressure increases as the tire's carcass heats. Too much cold temperature pressure prevents the tire from heating to the proper sticky temp. Too little overheats the tire and it gets really greasy. On track days most tire manufacturers will give you a ballpark stab at what your temps should be. You can compare that pressure to the pressure of the tire after some hot laps. In a previous life I raced a Ducati with WERA. On a motorcycle that hot/cold difference was around 3%. The principal us the same for a car, however the difference, well I have no clue. But I suppose the point being 1 or 2 pounds makes a difference on the street or on the track.
    Yeah it makes a big difference.

    I'm not sure if it's in the previous few pages, so here goes my writeup:

    Let's ignore some effects of camber, dynamic loads, etc... and simplify things for the moment.

    The surface of a car tire is flat. It lies flat against the road. The sidewalls provide some stiffness, but what's really holding the car up is the air....if your tires deflate, your rims run right against the ground (again, ignoring runflats). Ok, so with the tires under-inflated, the sidewall is pressed into the ground harder than the middle of the tire (no sidewall). Meaning that your tire actually bends inward slightly, as if it was cupping the road. This gives you more grip at the outside of the tires than the middle As you increase inflation, that cupping decreases, until you're at the ideal tire temp where everything is perfectly flat. Ta-da, max grip everywhere! But as you go too far, the air is pushing down too much, and the sidewalls can't keep up. So it does the opposite of the cupping, and actually balloons/bulges outward. Now you're gripping the road mainly with the middle of the tire and not using the edges to the fullest extent!



    To tell if you have the correct pressures, you can use a tire thermometer (pyrometer) to measure. Yep, temperature will tell you about your inflation!

    First, ignore that infrared thermometer. Unless you're doing something crazy like leaning out a window, reaching under the car, and aiming it at the tire mid-track...it's gonna give you a bogus number. By the time you slow the car, pull to a safe area, get out, walk to each tire, etc... everything will be meaningless. What you want is a probe pyrometer, that you actually jam into the tread.

    Ok, so you've got your equipment, you've done some hot-laps...how do you know if your tires are inflated right? Measure each tire's near the outer sidewall, right in the middle, then near the inner sidewall.
    1) If the two outer ones are HOTTER than the middle one - underinflated (the middle part of the tire isn't creating grip...friction...heat)
    2) If the two outer ones are COOLER than the middle one - over inflated
    3) If they're all the same - goldilocks, baby.

    Ok, so there are some other options, too, but I said we were ignoring camber. Lets throw it back in.
    (we ignore the middle reading for this part)
    4) The inner temp is HOTTER than the outer - too much negative camber
    5) The inner temp is COOLER than the outer - too much positive camber
    6) they're both the same - Now we're cooking!

    To be fair, you should probably get your camber dialed in first (if you have the ability). But you can combine 1/2/3 with 4/5/6, such as
    7) If your temperature increases evenly from inside to outside, your pressures are probably ok, but you have too much camber.
    8) If the inside and middle temps are both hotter than the outside - you probably have too much camber and too much pressure
    9) etc...



    Last edited by Grinder34; 10-11-2019 at 04:12 PM.

    Check out my journal here (Sold)
    My non-subaru journal here!

  12. Thanks Alin thanked for this post
    Likes MedicMike, Alin liked this post
  13. Top Of Page | #59
    MedicMike's Avatar

    User Info Menu

    Re: Wheel and tire tech

    Makes sense to me


Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •